How to Install Adobe Acrobat Reader on Ubuntu 22.04 

Adobe Acrobat is a well-known software that is mostly used to view, create, manipulate, and print managing Portable Document Format (PDF) files. Since Ubuntu has no native tools to manage PDFs, you can use Adobe Acrobat for all your work related to PDFs’.

The main advantage of using Adobe Acrobat is that it is an official program and is often recommended to perform all the tasks related to PDFs. Let’s start the process of installing Adobe Reader in Ubuntu.

Key Features of Adobe Acrobat Reader:

  1. Convert any Word file, Excel file, or PPT to PDF in just one click
  2. Create PDF documents in any format
  3. Capture web pages as rich and dynamic PDF files
  4. Scan PDF documents and automatically recognize characters with OCR

Steps to Install Adobe Acrobat in Ubuntu 22.04

We will guide you step-by-step with appropriate screenshots so that you can have a complete understanding of each step we perform.

Note: Adobe Acrobat has not been updated since 2013 for Linux so you might get lesser features as compared to the latest version of Adobe Acrobat.

Step 1: Updating System

It is one of the most important steps which is often ignored while installing any software on Ubuntu. This step will update all the indexes of the repository which we are going to use for downloading our Adobe Acrobat.

 sudo apt update 

sudo apt update

Step 2: Adding the Support of i386 Architecture

As we already mentioned, this is the older version of Adobe Acrobat and will require you to have support for 32-bit Architecture. By the given command, you can enable 32-bit support for your machine.

 sudo dpkg –add-architecture i386 

sudo dpkg --add-architecture i386

Step 3: Installing Necessary Software Dependencies for Adobe Acrobat

Almost every software that we do use on our Ubuntu system requires some packages on which software depends to run and this is why they are called dependencies.

Adobe Acrobat also requires some dependencies and you can install them by following commands:

 sudo apt install libxml2:i386 libcanberra-gtk-module:i386 gtk2-engines-murrine:i386 libatk-adaptor:i386 

Dependencies

Step 4: Getting Binary Package of Adobe Acrobat

After installing all the dependencies, let’s grab the binary package of Adobe Acrobat to move further in process of Installing Adobe Acrobat Reader on Ubuntu. The most recent version is 9.5.5.

 wget -O ~/adobe.deb ftp://ftp.adobe.com/pub/adobe/reader/unix/9.x/9.5.5/enu/AdbeRdr9.5.5-1_i386linux_enu.deb 

Binary packages

Step 5: Installing Adobe Acrobat Reader on Ubuntu 22.04

Now, after installing the binary packages you can install Adobe Acrobat Reader in your system by given commands:

 sudo apt install ./adobe.deb 

adobe deb

Adobe Acrobat Reader has been installed on your system.

Uninstalling Adobe Acrobat Reader from Ubuntu 22.04

If you are not satisfied with Adobe Acrobat Reader and want to uninstall it, you can easily remove it from your Ubuntu system by following commands:

 sudo apt-get purge adobereader-enu 

sudo apt-get purge adobereader-enu

That’s it, Adobe Acrobat Reader has been removed from your current system.

Frequently asked questions related to Adobe Acrobat Reader

How do I make Adobe Reader my default PDF viewer in Ubuntu?

Right-click on any PDF file that you currently have inside your file manager. Click on properties and select open with a tab. Find Adobe Acrobat Reader and select it. Press the button named Set as default. That’s it!

Is Adobe Reader free on Linux?

There are multiple versions available of Adobe Acrobat reader and the most basic version is free to use. Adobe is not supporting Linux development anymore but the last update is enough to complete basic tasks such as reading PDF files.

Related Post:

Which PDF reader do you prefer the most?

Adobe has not provided any update for Adobe Acrobat Reader for Ubuntu and other Linux-based distributions since 2013 which makes it far behind the new generation office tools. But if you prefer Adobe over anything, Adobe Acrobat reader version 9.5.5 should get your job done!

Sagar Sharma
Sagar Sharma

Sagar always uses Linux to its core and loves to write the technical side of system administration! While he's not writing, you can always find him exploring new Linux distros!

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